Chapter 5 - My Peace I Give to You - 2nd Question for Careful (Reading p.65)

Jesus’ declaration of thirst (19:28) may remind the reader of an earlier incident in which Jesus is thirsty (4:7-15) How might the conversation between Jesus and the Samaritan woman shed light on the meaning of Jesus’ death?

Respond below!!!

Comments

  • Kathy KPosted on 3/28/20

    In the story of the Samaritan woman the idea of thirst is that of the woman and all mankind for a living water which will satisfy us spiritually. That is the living water of Jesus - which can only come about through His death on the cross. Jesus thirst at His crucifixion is for the salvation of the souls of those He is dying for - all mankind. So as we are thirsting first our salvation, Jesus is providing it for us as He thirsts for us to accept it.

  • Krystyna WardPosted on 3/25/20

    Jesus conversation with The Samaritan woman indicates that He is the living water which can satisfy our thirst for God. By dying on the cross, Jesus open the gate of eternal life, our way to the Father for all who thirst.

  • Krystyna WardPosted on 3/25/20

    Jesus conversation with The Samaritan woman indicates that He is the living water which can satisfy our thirst for God. By dying on the cross, Jesus open the gate of eternal life, our way to the Father for all who thirst.

  • Margarita FelicianoPosted on 3/25/20

    So moving seeing those google images of the "Sisters of Charity, I thirst crucifix"... Jesus thirsts for all us, for our soul.

  • Deacon MichaelPosted on 3/24/20

    My sense is that this relationship is kind of a paradoxical one. Here in his “Hour” of Glory, the source of living water himself is thirsty. It is a reminder of the Lord’s human and divine natures. He as the source of living water ‘welling up to eternal life, would be associated with his divine nature. In his human nature as “true man” he was physically thirsty, a common understandable bodily need in this circumstance. The promise of never thirsting again refers to a “spiritual thirsty” meaning that the living water that Jesus offers is what will quench spiritual thirst that arises in the desert of a world that does not know the true “living water”. One of Mother Teresa’s favorite meditations was on the notion of Jesus’ thirst on the Cross. She said that the “thirst” that he calls out for from the Cross is the thirst for human love, the thirst that WE can satisfy for him. In the main chapel of the Sisters of Charity Mother House in Kolkata India there is a large crucifix behind the altar. And near it, under Jesus’ right arm is written on the wall “I Thirst”. It is so in every house chapel where the Sisters have daily mass all around the world. Google images for "sisters of charity I thirst crucifix" to see.

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