Welcome

 

Saint Josephine Bakhita Parish is a Christ centered, Roman Catholic faith community in Rocky Hill, Connecticut.

We are committed to being a welcoming, inclusive and hospitable parish celebrating vibrant Eucharistic liturgies for all ages.

We value an unwavering commitment to social justice and a compassionate outreach to all.

We also laud an innovative, lifelong and inter generational faith formation approach, embracing technology in the service of our ministries.    

 

Parish Picnic

The Bakhita Parish Picnic Photos are available for your viewing, all 217 of them!!

Click on Photos on the main menu...

Mass Times

Saturday Vigil:
4:30 PM @ St James Church

Sunday:
7:30, 9:00 AM @ St Elizabeth Seton Church
11AM @ St James Church:

Daily: Mon & Fri: 8:30 AM @St Elizabeth Seton
Tues & Thurs: 8:00 AM in the Chapel @ St James

Holy Days:
7:00 AM @ St James Church,
Noon@ Saint Elizabeth Seton Church,
7:00PM Evening Mass @ St James Church

Office Hours

9:00 AM - 2:30 PM Mon. - Fri.

Staff

On Line Giving

Choir Opportunity

An invitation for High School Singers & Musicians

 A group of Saint Elizabeth Seton singers going into high school this fall are interested in establishing a choir for high school men and women to sing at occasional masses. Only one Thursday rehearsal before a scheduled mass would be necessary. Instrumentalists are welcome as well. If interested, speak to Elizabeth Husmer, Director of Music at Saint Elizabeth's or sign up in theSES foyer.

New Sunday Vigil Mass time

On the 1st Sunday of Advent 2018, the time of the Vigil mass (Saturday, December 1, 2018) will be changed to 4PM instead of 4:30PM and will continue at that new time into the future.

Saint Josephine Bakhita North Campus

Saint Josephine Bakhita South Campus

Upcoming Funerals

 Carol Gemme, Friday October 5th at 2:00pm at Saint James Church

Barbara Higbee, Friday October 12th at 10:00pm at Saint Elizabeth Seton Church

 

 

 

Catholic News

St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

On Oct. 16, Roman Catholics celebrate the life of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque, the French nun whose visions of Christ helped to spread devotion to the Sacred Heart throughout the Western Church.Margaret Mary Alacoque was born in July of 1647. Her parents Claude and Philiberte lived modest but virtuous lives, while Margaret proved to be a serious child with a great focus on God. Claude died when Margaret was eight, and from age 9-13 she suffered a paralyzing illness. In addition to her father's death as well as her illenss, a struggle over her family's property made life difficult for Margaret and her mother for several years.During her illness, Margaret made a vow to enter religious life. During adolescence, however, she changed her mind. For a period of time she lived a relatively ordinary life, enjoying the ordinary social functions of her day and considering the possibility of marriage.However, her life changed in response to a vision she saw one night while returning from a dance, in which she saw Christ being scourged. Margaret believed she had betrayed Jesus, by pursuing the pleasures of the world rather than her religious vocation, and a the at the age of 22, she decided to enter a convent.Two days after Christmas of 1673, Margaret experienced Christ's presence in an extraordinary way while in prayer. She heard Christ explain that he desired to show his love for the human race in a special way, by encouraging devotion to “the heart that so loved mankind.� She experienced a subsequent series of private revelations regarding the gratitude due to Jesus on the part of humanity, and the means of responding through public and private devotion, but the superior of the convent dismissed this as a delusion. This dismissal was a crushing disappointment, affecting the nun's health so seriously that she nearly died. In 1674, however, the Jesuit priest Father Claude de la Colombiere became Margaret's spiritual director. He believed her testimony, and chronicled it in writing. Fr. de la Colombiere – later canonized as a saint – left the monastery to serve as a missionary in England. By the time he returned and died in 1681, Margaret had made peace with the apparent rejection of her experiences. Through St. Claude's direction, she had reached a point of inner peace, no longer concerned with the hostility of others in her community.In time, however, many who doubted her would become convinced as they pondered what St. Claude had written about the Sacred Heart. Eventually, her own writings and the accounts of her would face a rigorous examination by Church officials. By the time that occurred, however, St. Margaret Mary Alacoque had already gained what she desired: “To lose myself in the heart of Jesus.� She faced her last illness with courage, frequently praying the words of Psalm 73: “What have I in heaven, and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God?� She died on October 17, 1690, and was canonized by Pope Benedict XV in 1920.

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